2TM LOCAL NEWS

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  • Romy Gilbert

Mouse control workshops: research for projected future plagues

A series of on-farm mouse management workshops are running across the State, with Mullaley Hall set to host one tonight. Member for Tamworth Kevin Anderson is encouraging local landholders affected by mice to take advantage of the NSW Government’s workshop series.

“It’s great that Mullaley is hosting one of 16 workshops across the State that will give landholders tailored advice for their properties,” Mr Anderson said.

“There have already been nine workshops run across the State and it’s great to see the program expanded to include landholders in our region”.


Member for Northern Tablelands and Minister for Agriculture Adam Marshall wants farmers in the Golden Triangle to attend.


Workshops would be held at Bingara, Croppa Creek and Moree in the next few weeks, giving farmers the best tools and information available to manage and bait effectively for mice.


“Bringing together the expertise of organisations such as NSW DPI, Local Land Services (LLS), the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC) and CSIRO these events are about giving primary produces the best advice to manage the problem before them,” Mr Marshall said.


“The workshops will explain to people how to determine the level of mice population on their property, reduce numbers prior to sowing, protect their crop post germination and manage the health implications associated with the vermin.


“Assisting local farmers will be Australia’s leading mice expert, Steve Henry from the CSRIO, who has more than 25 years’ experience in this field.


“If you can’t make it to a local event, the NSW Department of Primary Industries (DPI) will be broadcasting live from Cumnock this Friday so everyone can access the advice and ask questions in real time.


“Off the back-of the drought and floods in the west of the region, I understand how much pressure the infestation is placing on households, in what should be a positive time for primary production with improved seasonal conditions.


“Managing this problem will take a community and effort, which is why I urge as many people as possible to register, attend and access tailored advice for their properties,” said Mr Marshall.


NSW Famers and the CWA of NSW hosted a Parliamentary Briefing on the mouse plague recently, to reflect the deep concerns of their members and regional communities. NSW Farmers CEO James Jackson said it was important to make sure that politicians are aware of the worsening economic and public health situation impacting NSW.


“It’s causing significant economic impacts; our crops are being eaten, our seeds that we are planting are being eaten, our stored grain and hay is being destroyed, machinery is being damaged in our sheds and our lifestyle has been decimated because the house is full of mice”.


NSW Farmers have welcomed the series of workshops, stating that they could become quite useful in gathering information for fighting future mouse plagues.


“The projections are that we are going to have these plagues more often rather than less often, so it is important we put all the facts on the table and make sure people are aware of it” said Mr Jackson.


“We need collaborative research done to make sure we have the tools for next time”.